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Research & Facilities

The newly established Ultrafast Nanophotonics group at the University of Paderborn focuses its research on optical properties of artificial material system. Modern nanotechnology opens the possibility to manipulate the arrangement and structure of natural materials down to the nanoscale comparable to the optical wavelength. This freedom allows a direct engineering of the optical material properties that can be utilized for a new class of photonic devices and applications.
The characterization of the optical properties of such material systems plays an important role for the further design and to proof principle concepts arising from new physical effects. Ultrafast spectroscopy is the key in order to understand the underlying processes in these materials that lead to the desired functionality.
In combination with strongly confined optical fields based on Plasmonic excitations these materials posses the potential for highly compact and ultrafast optical devices.

The availability of optical materials with user-defined optical properties that would fulfil perfectly the requirements of applications are highly desired in the photonics industry. The lack of such materials limits realization of optical devices. With the progress in nanofabrication technology we are now confronted with the ability to freely engineer artificial nanostructures down to a few nanometers well below the optical wavelength. Such materials, if designed properly, can exhibit completely new optical properties that are not available by any natural material. The best known example is…

Confining optical fields to extremely small volumes is one of the biggest challenge in order to miniaturize optical elements down to a chip level to be comparable in size with electronic elements like the transistor. Here, the excitation of electronic surface states on a metal-dielectric interface might open a new way for guiding light in extremely small volumes without losing the possibility of high speed operation. However, these electronic excitations, so-called Surface Plasmon Polaritons, are inherently lossy and signals can be transferred only over short distances. In our group we…

The availability of optical materials with user-defined optical properties that would fulfil perfectly the requirements of applications are highly desired in the photonics industry. The lack of such materials limits realization of optical devices. With the progress in nanofabrication technology we are now confronted with the ability to freely engineer artificial nanostructures down to a few nanometers well below the optical wavelength. Such materials, if designed properly, can exhibit completely new optical properties that are not available by any natural material. The best known example is…

Many optical applications require small and highly efficient optical light sources. In particular quantum optical and on-chip devices would greatly profit from ultrasmall sources. However, the efficiency of conventional light emitters is in general extremely poor. Our research activities in the field of ultrasmall light sources are therefore focused mainly on strategies of enhancing the emission efficiency by directly modifying the emission characteristic by plasmonic nanoantennas or by utilizing the strong confinement and large radiation enhancement of Surface Plasmon Polaritons to increase…

Head

Prof. Dr. Donat Josef As

Optoelectronic Semiconductors - Group III-Nitrides

Donat Josef As
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5838
Fax:
+49 5251 60-5843
Office:
P8.2.10

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